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Buy the book, “Blood on the Talon”

Some viewers are emailing me asking how to find the book, “Blood on the Talon”. I’ll leave this as a sticky post for a while to help readers get there easier. Simply click on the book image and it will take you to the secure ordering site where you can use Paypal or buy from Amazon. The introductory price has ended due to the sales volume. The retail price of $44.95 is in effect.

STEN Mk V Test Firing

Finally, the weather and my brain are clear enough for the first test firing. Armed with the STEN (and firing pin), safety materials, cleaning rod to check the barrel, ammo, camera etc I took to the desert to check my efforts. The ammo was Winchester 9mm, 115 grain, fmj. I fired at a range of 15 meters.

1. Test fired one round from an original magazine. Feeding was uneventful. I held the weapon in such a manner as to prevent any rearward flying components from striking me. The weapon fired without a problem and the spent casing was ejected slightly forward of the 3 o’clock position and about 5 meters from the weapon.

2. I loaded 3 rounds into the magazine and fired each one slowly, again with no feeding problems.

3. Next I tried a 15 round magazine firing at an average rapidity. Again, no problems whatsoever.

4. I fired a series of 25 round magazines at differing rates of semi-auto firing, again with no issues.

5. The final test was with a 25 round magazine at rapid semi-auto firing. Flawless.

OBSERVATIONS:

a. I am extremely pleased that the weapon functioned without one fail or malfunction through 150 rounds of ammo.

b. I had adjusted and seasoned the two springs in accordance with the IO instructions. I did not have to make ANY adjustments.

c. I constructed and modified the selector switch iaw IO instructions so that it functions as a safety. In the A position, the trigger can be pulled, but the tripping lever does not release the block. In the R position, it fires in the semi-auto mode. This weapon will not fire in FA.

d. I would not use the A position as a safety. Placing the bolt handle in the upper slot leaves the block aft and breech open. That is the preferred method for me.

e. I am amazed that there is virtually no muzzle climb during rapid firing. The barrel can be held on target easily while firing from the hip. VERY controllable.

f. Virtually no recoil is felt owing to the nearly 10lbs weight of the weapon and magazine.

g. The casings seem to have a few more dings to the base than I am used to seeing. I’ve added an image for review.
9mm
h. The barrel seems to be well grooved as the spent round is nicely marked.

i. Post firing inspection of the gun revealed no damage or adverse wear.

j. Most of the spent casings were within a few inches of one another indicating a very constant ejection.

k. Final Observation. I used my video editing software to time the durations from the first round firing to the last. It took 4.009 seconds to discharge 25 rounds. That equates to a 366 rpm rate of fire in SA. Not bad.

Heres the link to the video:

 

STEN Test Firing

Lt. John J. McNamee Awarded Silver Star

A recent comment by the daughter-in-law of 1st. Lt. John J. McNamee prompted this post. Lt. McNamee was leading an engineer mission on 29 Mar 45. The citation appears below as taken from 17th Airborne General Order No. 50.

img026 img025

Mike Shares More Photos

WWII007 cropThese are photos taken from Camp Chiseldon near Swindon England. Some were labelled England, Swindon England or Swindon Wiltz England. I know they trained for the Germany invasion and he received more glider training here. The first photo is my dad (Jack Maggard, left) and Sgt. James Bazar (right). I copied back to show dad was Col. Willard K. Liebel’s (17th AB Chief of Staff) driver and Sgt. Bazar was Gen. Miley’s driver. You can see Bazer passed away in 1994. My dad passed away in 2004. The photo was sent to Peewee my dad’s penpal whom he later married (my mom). My dad is pictured charging with the Garand with “England’ on top. Of the three buddies in front of the jeep, I know the center guy with the garrison cap is Algie Glasscock. He’s in other pics but with helmet on.WWII003 crop WWII005 crop WWII006 crop WWII011 crop

 

 

139th AEB Situation Report: 29 Mar 1945

No6 29 Mar 45 p1 – Copy

Another Ration Can

I just added this ration can to my collection. By all accounts it appears to be a WW2 ration can used to hold tea for use in field kitchens. I have not made a 100% positive confirmation of this by photographic evidence, but the OD finish, the nondescript lettering and the lacquered interior finish all point to WW2 war-time use by the Army

tea_can

139th AEB Situation Report: 28 Mar 1945

No5 28 Mar 45 – Copy

Parachutist’s First Aid Kit

Found this in an antique store about 12 years ago. IT was opened with the contents as shown here. The syrette is empty, having dried up long ago. I left everything as I found it. The previous owner had opened every thing to see inside.The image shows the entire contents of the Parachutist’s First Aid Kit along with the original instruction tag. Its amazing that all of that stuff was crammed into such a small space. The contents of the kit are as follows:

  • Small rubberized pouch with tie strings for securing to helmet, belt or equipment straps
  • Tourniquet for severe wounds where pressure dressing will not stop the bleeding
  • Wound tablets, sulfadiazine to be taken for severe wounds and prevent infection
  • Morphine syrette to be administered for severe pain. Person giving the morphine was to mark an “M” on the recipients forehead to alert medical personnel that morhine had previously been given
  • Small “Carlisle Model” first aid dressing
  • Cardboard tbe with iodine sway in glass amouple
  • Instruction sheet for Morphine and tourniquet

para_First_Aid

Standard Ammo Load, 17th Airborne Division

This document comes form the 17th Airborne Division G-3 Standard Operating Procedures.SOP for Ammunition Use in 17th AB Division

Phonograph Gasket Works

Just cut and sized the gasket material to make a replacement gasket for my WW2 phonograph. It is ever so slightly larger than required, but by shaving off a very thin layer of the inside diameter of the material, the tone arm fit snugly into the sound reproducer with no problem.Phonograph gasket

Village Code Names, 17th A/B Division, Ardennes Campaign

VIllage Code Names The enclosed document identifies the villages near Bastogne and the associated code names to be used in the clear when transmitting information over unsecure means.